Month: January 2023

DigiComPass kick-off project meeting

DigiComPass kick-off project meeting
DigiComPass Logo (Kick-Off Meeting)
DigiComPass_Logo

The aim of the DigiComPass Project is to develop a modern accreditation model for digital competencies (based on the DigComp 2.1 Framework for Citizens). This needs a practical innovation and training boost for the trainers (as well as the training facilities). Therefore, this project develops staff competencies that lead to overall improvements in the provision, targeting, and effectiveness of adult education. This includes assessment of prior knowledge and skills of adult learners, better and more innovative teaching methods, and strengthening the adult education staff’s supporting role in motivating, guiding, and advising learners in challenging learning situations. The first DigiComPass meeting of partners took place in Wiener Neustadt, Austria.

The rationale of the project

Digital Competences (DigComp) are crucial for citizens today and in the future. In Europe, the average level in DigComp of well-educated citizens is approx. 56%. Several countries (Italy, Cyprus, Spain, and Greece) are below, and Austria is at the average (Source: DigComp Framework 2.0  P 19).
The COVID-19 situation showed that digital competencies are a must for all people, in all generations, and in all living conditions and situations.

The DigiComPass Kick-Off Meeting

The DigiComPass Kick-Off Meeting took place in Wiener Neustadt from January 16th to January 17th, 2023. Partners from BrainLog (DK), IFESCoop (ES), Europäische Bildungsinitiative (AT), Prometeo (IT), K.A.NE. (GR) and the coordination organisation, the University of Cyprus (CY) participated. Due to various issues, the FLGobal (USA) could not send a representative.

Objectives and concrete results of the DigiComPass Project

  • Pilot courses will be created (and evaluated) on the mentioned items, together with an appropriate recognition model for adults. These developments are summarized in an “Adult Education package” called DigiCompass.
  • The objectives are to create a recognition & course model for Digital Competences with
    • A pedagogical framework (based on Flipped Learning 3.0)
    • A quality-enhance framework for course creation, implementation, and evaluation
    • Pilot courses covering the items of the DigComp 2.1 Citizens framework (https://goo.gl/T8TpJ9)
    • A recognition model for Europe defining the curriculum, training environment, evaluation and grading, and consistent certification (which could be used internationally as well). The model fits perfectly with the Europass CV. This model should be practicable global as well.
    • Use of modern digital badges (open badges system) for the recognition model
  • A “floating guide” to define the way of adaptation for future developments
  • A transferability guide for School Education

Topics addressed in the DigiComPass  project meeting

The program-related keywords are: Digital skills and competencies – Creating new, innovative, or joint curricula or courses – Key competencies development

For the project, relevant keywords are: Digital Competencies Training, Flipped Learning 3.0, Multimedia and Interactive training content.

Ethical Values

Ethical Values
Ethical Values were identified by a nonpartisan, nonsectarian (secular) group of youth development experts in 1992 as “core ethical values that transcend cultural, religious, and socioeconomic differences”. The Six Pillars of Character are: Trustworthiness, Respect, Responsibility, Fairness, Caring and Citizenship.
The past decade has seen a significant shift in ethical values and attitudes, driven by a number of factors including technological advancements, social and political movements, and global events. Consequently, some significant changes in ethical values and attitudes are visible, with some developments having a negative impact on society. In particular, there has been a rise in certain unethical behaviors and attitudes, such as hate speech, racism, bullying, and similar issues, that are facilitated by technology and the internet.

The EBI has launched a case study and asked five partners from Erasmus+ projects to share their impressions about their observations, especially in relation to their learners (and – of course – to their trainers). The results are made visible in the slide show (Data for the case study: 6 organisations, 18 trainers, and heads sent back the questionnaire).

Remark: Use the errors to see all seven slides with the statistical-processed data!

Asked Questions

  1. Our trainers/we as an organisation/I as a person have noted various societal problems, such as hatred on the net, lack of togetherness, discrimination, and prejudice based on race, gender, sexual orientation, and similar.
  2. Our trainers/we as an organisation/I as a person have been observing an inevitable decline in values in society lately, like hatred on the net, lack of togetherness, discrimination, and prejudice based on race, gender, and sexual orientation, which worries them.
  3. Our trainers have recently observed a decline in moral principles among learners, like missing respect, lack of togetherness, discrimination, and prejudice based on race, or gender.
  4. Our organisation seeks to provide trainers with a uniform basic attitude toward ethics and morals.
  5. Our organisation aims to positively impact learners through a unified ethical stance and thus have some influence on the positive development of society.
  6. For our organisation, a uniform ethical attitude within the team is essential.
  7. In the future, our organisation wants to offer training and education on moral principles in specific areas (e.g., behaviour on the net, green values).

Findings and deeper-going interpretation (Ethical Values)

The COVID-19 pandemic has brought about significant changes in many aspects of society, including ethical values. As one factor, the COVID-19 crisis has highlighted disparities and inequalities within society. The pandemic has exposed systemic issues such as income inequality, racial and ethnic discrimination, and inadequate healthcare systems. These disparities have raised ethical questions about the allocation of resources and the obligations of governments and corporations to address these issues.

Hate speech and cyberbullying

The anonymity and reach of the internet have created a platform for hate speech and cyberbullying, where individuals can attack and harass others with relative impunity. This has created a new set of ethical challenges, as people struggle to balance the right to free speech with the need to protect individuals from harm.

Racism and discrimination

The past decade has seen a resurgence of racist and discriminatory attitudes, with many people using the internet to spread hate and misinformation. This has raised ethical questions about the responsibility of tech companies and individuals to address and combat these harmful behaviors.

Online harassment and doxxing

The internet has also facilitated the rise of online harassment and doxing, where individuals use the web to threaten and intimidate others. This has led to a growing concern about the ethical implications of online behavior and the need for greater protection and accountability.

Intergenerational ethical approach

It’s not accurate to say that the intergenerational ethical approach has changed negatively in the last decade, but it can be argued that the challenges to achieving intergenerational ethics have increased. Despite increased awareness and a growing recognition of the need to prioritize intergenerational ethical considerations, many of the problems facing future generations have become more acute in recent years.

For example, climate change and environmental degradation have continued to worsen, and income inequality has increased in many parts of the world, making it more difficult to achieve a sustainable and equitable future for all. Additionally, technological advancements have brought new challenges, such as the rise of artificial intelligence and the potential for technological unemployment, that require careful consideration from an intergenerational ethical perspective.

Conclusion

In conclusion, while the past decade has seen many positive developments in ethical values, it has also brought new ethical challenges, particularly with regards to hate speech, racism, bullying, and similar issues that are facilitated by technology and the internet. Addressing these negative trends will require a collective effort to promote responsible and ethical behavior online and offline.

DigiComPass – a new challenge

The EBI is a partner of the DigiComPass Project. Digital Competencies (DigComp) are crucial for citizens today and in the future. In Europe, the average level in DigComp of well-educated citizens is approx. 56%. Several countries (Italy, Cyprus, Spain, and Greece) are below, and Austria is at the average (Source: DigComp Framework 2.0, P 19). The COVID-19 situation showed that digital competencies are a must for all people, in all generations, and in all living conditions and situations. Increasing the digital competencies of Citizens is a challenge.

DigiComPass-Digital-Skills
Development of digital skills within the last 7 years (Source: Eurostat – Data, visualization – Peter Mazohl)

The graphic shows the data of several European countries ordered by the percentage of digital skills from 2021. The distribution of countries shows partners with higher values (than the European average) and lower values. This enables to learn from each other and to develop optimized strategies to create and implement training courses for >European citizens.

Project priorities

The project focuses on two specific priorities of the Erasmus+ Project.

① Improving the competencies of educators and other adult education staff

The aim of the project is to develop a modern accreditation model for digital competencies (based on the DigComp 2.1 Framework for Citizens). This needs an effective Innovation and training boost for the trainers (as well as the training facilities).
Therefore, this project develops staff competencies that lead to overall improvements in the provision, targeting, and effectiveness of adult education. This includes assessment of prior knowledge and skills of adult learners, better and more innovative teaching methods, as well as strengthening the supporting role the adult education staff has in motivating, guiding, and advising learners in challenging learning situations.

② Addressing digital transformation through the development of digital readiness, resilience, and capacity

The DigiComPass enables the participating training organizations to increase the capacity and readiness of institutions to manage an effective shift toward digital education. The project will implement the purposeful use of digital technologies in education and training for teaching, learning, assessment, and engagement. This will be done in the frame of the technical concept of the implemented Flipped Learning 3.0 Framework. This implementation of the framework is a base for the development of digital pedagogy and expertise in the use of digital tools for teachers and trainers, including accessible and assistive technologies and the creation and innovative use of digital education content.

Objectives and concrete results

The major objective is to create a course package for digital skills similar to the European Computer Driving License (ECDL), but with a specific focus on the DigComp framework 2.2 and free from licence fees. The offer of the modular DigiComPass courses enables digital transformation through the development of digital readiness, resilience, and capacity.

Since COVID-19 we know that these competencies are crucial. Social distancing is the best practice example of the importance of deeper going digital competencies, for example, to deal with authorities (eGovernment) or to be able to use the Digital Signature to access eGovernmental and other services. All these issues are described in the DigComp framework and will be part of the new training of DigiComPass.

DigiComPass-Adult-Active-Learning
Active learning in the Group Space. The implementation of the developed courses will use the Flipped Learning 3.0 Framework.

Major objectives and concrete results

Pilot courses will be created (and evaluated) on the mentioned items, together with an appropriate recognition model for adults. These developments are summarized in an “Adult Education package” called DigiComPass.

The objectives are to create a recognition & course model for Digital Competences with

  • A pedagogical framework (based on Flipped Learning 3.0)
  • A quality-enhance framework for course creation, implementation, and evaluation
  • Pilot courses covering the items of the DigComp 2.1 Citizens framework (https://goo.gl/T8TpJ9)
  • A recognition model for Europe defining the curriculum, training environment, evaluation and grading, and consistent certification (which could be used internationally as well). The model fits perfectly with the Europass CV. This model should be practicable globally as well.
  • Use of modern digital badges (open badges system) for the recognition model

A “floating guide” to define the way of adaptation for future developments

A transferability guide for School Education